February 1, 2023

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Lincoln actor Colin McFarlane has urged people to avoid going to Lincoln County Hospital unnecessarily after his mother waited an hour outside A&E and it took her 14 hours to get a bed.

Mr McFarlane, who is the voice of The Cube and has featured in Batman films, has been Tweeting his…….

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Lincoln actor Colin McFarlane has urged people to avoid going to Lincoln County Hospital unnecessarily after his mother waited an hour outside A&E and it took her 14 hours to get a bed.

Mr McFarlane, who is the voice of The Cube and has featured in Batman films, has been Tweeting his family’s experiences after his 92-year-old mum was taken to hospital by ambulance twice in just a few days.

Mrs McFarlane first visited hospital following concerns from her carers across November 7-8, and had to wait two hours in the ambulance before then facing another 12 hours to be placed in a bed.

She was discharged, but family and carers again called an ambulance on Tuesday morning when she spent an hour and a half in the vehicle ambulance and then waited 14 hours for a bed at 1.20am on Wednesday.

Colin has since called on people to take more care when deciding whether to visit the hospital, including not going if not necessary and wearing a mask outside of hospitals.

In a video message on Twitter he said: “Lincoln County Hospital at the moment is having an absolutely horrendous time, and if this is reflected across the country, then we as a nation are in trouble because they are overstretched, understaffed and obviously COVID is on the increase.”

He said he was told his mother could only have one visitor for one hour a day.

Speaking to Local Democracy Reporters, Colin said he had been told staff had “never seen it like this” and were “all concerned because they haven’t reached their winter peak”.

He sympathised with the situation staff faced, but said: “You can absolutely see how someone can die in that situation because of the stress, especially if they don’t understand what’s going on.”

He was also concerned at what impact the long waits had on patients, with his mother now having deep vein thrombosis in her leg – something she didn’t have when she was admitted – and the communication between patients’ families and NHS Staff.

He said he hadn’t been told initially when his mother was moved to another ward, despite being reassured he would be.